Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: Gettysburg

Gettysburg 20 May 2014 19:42 #1

  • MickA
  • MickA's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 160
  • Thank you received: 2
  • Karma: 0
Just watched the film, now I don't know how accurate it is but how the hell was Lee seen to be such a beloved, great general after that battle? The Southern commanders were incompetent, even when they knew the orders would have disastrous consequences they still followed them...
If you don't stand for something you'll fall for anything...
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Gettysburg 21 May 2014 17:01 #2

  • Brett
  • Brett's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 318
  • Thank you received: 3
  • Karma: 2
Up to that point he hadn't lost a battle and only drawn one, namely Antietam, which is why he got over confident at Gettysburg. He believed the Army of Northern Virginia was invincible. What wasn't portrayed in the film that he was under immense pressure to fight a victorious final decisive battle, before the huge advantage the Union had in men and material was finally used correctly, which is what happened when Grant took command of course. As a result he took exceptional risks.

Gettysburg was the all or nothing battle for the Confederacy, which is why they threw everything into it and took such large casualties.

The morale of the army after Gettysburg remained good as the men understood the position Lee was in and he was the only one that seemed to be able to unify an army from all the southern states. Bearing in mind that most of the senior Generals, including Lee, were Virginians (the most notable exception being Longstreet who was from South Carolina), there were rumblings all the time from Generals from other states. Lee was also diplomatic and able to obtain co-operation etc.

Lee was revered by his men and a lot of them were fighting for him come the end....

He seemed to have a charisma that all the great commanders had. Napoleon, Alexander, Julius Caesar as a start.

You can't apply modern thinking to Confederate soldiers in 1863, who deeply believed in their cause, rightly or wrongly.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Gettysburg 21 May 2014 17:30 #3

  • MickA
  • MickA's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 160
  • Thank you received: 2
  • Karma: 0
If he'd acted sooner he could have won, allowing the Federal troops time to take the high ground was what started the disaster.
If you don't stand for something you'll fall for anything...
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Gettysburg 21 May 2014 23:18 #4

  • Fastbreeze
  • Fastbreeze's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • New Member
  • Posts: 14
  • Karma: 0
Points to bare in mind, and these are important.
For once the Confederacy was fighting on Union soil, and Lee's eyes in the form of Jeb Stuart was a great distance away on a raiding mission. Therefore not knowing sufficiently the strength and dispositions of the Union troops created probable caution in Lee's intent.

Again lack of detailed understanding of the ground led to the Confederates not correctly identifying the significance of Little Round Top. Something that was nearly missed by also by the Union troops but for the timely arrival of an engineering officer, I believe.

The fact that they allowed the Union troops to consolidate during the night was the costly mistake. But I believe the formations tasked were bone weary for a long advance to contact march.

Hindsight is a wonderful thing, and foresight is helped by good intelligence. Know the ground, your strengths and weaknesses and know your enemies.
Last Edit: 21 May 2014 23:24 by Fastbreeze. Reason: Significance of union engineering officer
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Gettysburg 17 Jun 2014 13:58 #5

  • Who?
  • Who?'s Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 58
  • Karma: 0
I thought the Confederates were fighting for their rats?
The administrator has disabled public write access.
Time to create page: 0.250 seconds